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Advances in Geosciences An open-access journal for refereed proceedings and special publications
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Volume 7
Adv. Geosci., 7, 327-331, 2006
https://doi.org/10.5194/adgeo-7-327-2006
© Author(s) 2006. This work is licensed under
the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.5 License.
Adv. Geosci., 7, 327-331, 2006
https://doi.org/10.5194/adgeo-7-327-2006
© Author(s) 2006. This work is licensed under
the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.5 License.

  09 May 2006

09 May 2006

Cyclogenesis in the lee of the Atlas Mountains: a factor separation numerical study

K. Horvath1, L. Fita2, R. Romero2, B. Ivancan-Picek1, and I. Stiperski1 K. Horvath et al.
  • 1Meteorological and Hydrological Service of Croatia, Gric 3, 10000 Zagreb, Croatia
  • 2University of the Balearic Islands, Ctra. de Valldemossa, 07122 Palma de Mallorca, Spain

Abstract. The initiation of a deep and severe impact Mediterranean cyclone in the lee of Atlas Mountains is investigated by a series of numerical experiments using the MM5 forecast model. Roles of orography, surface sensible heat flux and an upper-level potential vorticity anomaly are identified using factor separation method. Results of model simulations show that orography blocking is responsible for generation of the low-level shallow vortex in the first phase of lee development. Upper-level potential vorticity is a principal ingredient of this event, responsible for a dominant deepening effect in the later stage of lee formation. Analysis of cyclone paths shows that orography tends to keep the cyclone stationary, while upper-level dynamical factors are crucial for advection of the system to the Mediterranean Sea. The most noteworthy influence of surface sensible heat flux is identified as an afternoon destruction of a surface baroclinic zone and associated weaker cyclogenesis.

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