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Advances in Geosciences An open-access journal for refereed proceedings and special publications
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Volume 39
Adv. Geosci., 39, 107–114, 2014
https://doi.org/10.5194/adgeo-39-107-2014
© Author(s) 2014. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
Adv. Geosci., 39, 107–114, 2014
https://doi.org/10.5194/adgeo-39-107-2014
© Author(s) 2014. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

  27 Jun 2014

27 Jun 2014

Particle tracking modeling of sediment-laden jets

S. N. Chan1 and J. H. W. Lee2 S. N. Chan and J. H. W. Lee
  • 1Croucher Laboratory of Environmental Hydraulics, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong. Presently: School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore
  • 2Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Hong Kong

Abstract. This paper presents a general model to predict the particulate transport and deposition from a sediment-laden horizontal momentum jet. A three-dimensional (3-D) stochastic particle tracking model is developed based on the governing equation of particle motion. The turbulent velocity fluctuations are modelled by a Lagrangian velocity autocorrelation function that captures the trapping of sediment particles in turbulent eddies, which result in the reduction of settling velocity. Using classical solutions of mean jet velocity, and turbulent fluctuation and dissipation rate profiles derived from computational fluid dynamics calculations of a pure jet, the equation of motion is solved numerically to track the particle movement in the jet flow field. The 3-D particle tracking model predictions of sediment deposition and concentration profiles are in excellent agreement with measured data. The computationally demanding Basset history force is shown to be negligible in the prediction of bottom deposition profiles.

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